The end of Canada as we have known it – but is that a bad thing?

Click here – Chris Hedges on C-51: They have won, and it is up to us – for the article that motivated me to write these comments.

From my perspective, the Nation-State model is well past its best-before-date and needs to be brought to an end. My preference would be an absolute breakdown of the global financial/monetary/economic system as I think that would be the least damaging to the majority of ordinary citizens of most countries.

Less damaging certainly than unrestricted global war over the last of the non-renewable resources and those that, while technically renewable, have been depleted beyond their ability to recover.

Less damaging than monstrous pandemics that blind-side us from unexpected sources, incubate and travel on our vaunted air travel networks to every corner of the Earth before showing their true colours.

Less damaging even than critical food shortages caused by climate change related droughts, land and ocean based species die-offs and the worldwide inability to move goods safely and expediently.

And less damaging than the chaos caused by the massive migration of humanity away from the tropics and former temperate zones towards the poles.

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So . . . What’s Up?

Homo Sapiens is the only species of life we know which has the abilities to choose how it lives in the world. Right now, we are living in a dangerously destructive manner and threatening all life on Earth, including our own.


Imagine a large flock of birds living in a mature, deciduous tree – a Big Leaf Maple in my part of the world. These birds have found a food source in the seeds of the tree and an even better one in the insects that live in and under the tree’s bark which they can expose by pecking and pulling the bark off the tree trunk. Ideal nest building material is available within walking distance from the small root fibres of the tree which the birds scratch up with their feet and pull off with their beaks. Life is good and the flock thrives, increasing its population with every passing year.

Until the catastrophe. One spring the tree buds do not appear; there will be no seeds in the fall. Insects are plentiful and easy to obtain as what bark is left is now dry, curled up and easy to knock off the tree. When the birds run down to the ground to gather nesting material, they find that the rootlets are also dry and do not bend into a suitable shape for nest building. With the females ready to lay, a decision is made to move to another tree.

There are no other Big Leaf Maples nearby as no seeds have survived to germinate for many years. The birds find that their wing structure has atrophied from lack of use and they can no longer fly well enough to reach another stand. Eventually, the eggs are laid in shallow nests on the ground but predators ensure that none hatch. Although the mature birds survive well enough for their normal lifespan, no new chicks are ever produced and the species is extirpated from that locale.


Now imagine a massive population of large, self-aware mammels living in a way that destroys all the resources they rely on for life.The air they breathe, the water they drink, the food they eat, the clothing and shelter that protects them from the elements. Oceans are acidified, soils made barren, forests denuded, grasslands turned to deserts, wetlands drained, aquifers polluted or emptied, severe storms amplified. Evidence abounds to show that the change being made by humans during the anthropocene epoch is greater and compressed into a shorter time period than corresponding changes during any of the five preceding great extinction events.

Many non-scientific people believe that new and wonderous technologies will emerge to save humanity and the rest of life from these depredations. Perhaps this accounts for the popularity of fantasy, magic, wizardry, super-heroism and other phantasmagorical subjects in current fiction. So far the two most promising candidates for feeding ourselves might be Soylent Green, which was foreshadowed in a 1973 Hollywood movie and Soylent Pink, which we already have in abundance.

Looking for ideas for the weekend? Soylent Green and 1984 would make a good pairing for a depressing late-night home theatre extravaganza.

Self-Imposed Extinction is Apparently Preceeded by Mass Insanity

Read this release from the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) regarding the CCW Meeting of Experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS) which will take place from 13 to 17 April 2015 at the United Nations in Geneva.

Humankind is facing the very real prospect of extinction from the effects of Anthropogenic Climate Change and what are we doing? — developing weapons systems which can make their own decisions about who to kill and when. Although the potential will exist for these systems to solve the climate change issue (everyone working at fossil fuel company headquarters, politicians around the globe who continue to support fossil fuel use, anyone driving a Hummer and so on) this is not what they are being developed for . . . at least not until someone hacks into the control software.

To great fanfare about “intelligence” and “lithium from Russia” they will be sent off to unfriendly nations (accompanied by a couple of CF18’s to show that Canadian politicos have big balls too) to bomb electronic factories and stop those countries’ WMD-by-LAWS programs; which don’t exist of course.

Picture these drones gleefully raining down death upon hapless Bangladeshi factory workers who are waving banners declaring that they are just developing a more efficient way of delivering pizza.

My question would be: How long can these things continue to Autonomously fuel themselves and continue operations after the last humans have apparently expired? Do they ultimately win or will there be some “Preppers” hiding in culvert pipes buried 40 feet down in the USA (eating KD that is years past its best before date and drinking their own, or possibly each others’ urine) who will emerge after one of the LAWS has imbibed the last gulp of Jet A.

Either way, I wouldn’t wanna survive this one.

Simplicity

I am reading “Simplicity” – Edward de Bono, 1998.

The author points out the difficulty of simplifying forms if it is undertaken by people who know the system.

“They cannot see why anyone should find ambiguities or difficulties. Perhaps there could be a professional ‘simple-minded’ body which could be hired to ‘misunderstand’ basic instructions.The experts would then have to outwit the simple-minded people so that these people could no longer make mistakes.”